All-New Photo-Sharing App Takes A Roadtrip

29. April 2013 07:06 by Calvin Yu in Technology News  //  Tags: , , , , , , , ,   //   Comments

Divvy

Divvy, a dynamic photo-sharing application available for Mac OS and Microsoft Windows that takes its name from the abbreviated form of the verb divide, is ready to hit the road.

Reaching out to new users across the nation

Jeremy Greenfield and Keyvon Olomi, who founded Divvy, have set out on a cross-country road trip to promote and market the app, which enables users to view and save photos from all of their favorite social media outlets, like Facebook and Instagram, and also to share the images with individuals, groups, people nearby, and their friends and followers on Facebook and Twitter.

After leaving Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 1, the two, as of this writing, are touring the Northeast with plans to visit colleges in the greater Boston metropolitan area before heading to Denver in the next three weeks.

A new and easier way to share photos via social media

Olomi, who founded AppTank in late 2010, devised Divvy to alleviate the tedious hassle of moving between Facebook and Instagram to share photos with friends, as well as the inconvenience of Instagram's lack of zoom and save features. In addition, he designed Divvy so that its users could share photos more privately than on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Even better, a user can snap a picture and use the “Around Me” feature to instantly share the image with whomever he or she wants!

Yet another neat thing about Divvy is that a user can take a printout from any printer, be it a conventional inkjet or laser model or the Little Printer, the Circle Printer, and the PocketJet printer, snap a photo with Divvy and share it with all of his or her friends, family and followers.

However, the feature that Greenfield and Olomi are touting as Divvy's main selling point is its photo aggregation capabilities, which entails linking with users' Facebook and Instagram accounts, displaying images from the respective feeds and enabling Divvy users to share photos with nearby Divvy users, individuals, groups and all their followers. 

Although at this time, Facebook and Instagram are the only two social media platforms that link with Divvy, there are immediate plans to support the capability to link with users' Twitter, Tumblr, Flickr, and Dropbox accounts. Nonetheless, the reviews on Divvy's page on iTunes' App Store website are indeed glowing.

How to Stay Organized With a Tickler File

19. April 2013 09:06 by Calvin Yu in Productivity  //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments

During your quest to become a master of Inbox Zero, you’ll inevitably come across stuff in your inbox that doesn’t seem to have a home of its own. As we already know from experience, any stuff that doesn’t have a home, by default, makes its home right there in your inbox, along with all the other homeless stuff that gets piled up on top of it. 

Usually homeless stuff comes in the form of reminders. Reminders become the vagrants of your inbox simply because there’s unfinished business associated with it that prevents you from filing it away. So how do you deal with reminders?

What if I told you that there actually is a home for all those vagrant reminders? That home is a tickler file! And in this blog post, I’ll describe how this useful tool will ensure that no reminder is ever left forgotten or left sitting there in your inbox.  If I didn’t have this system, I don’t know how I would have grown remembered all the things to do for my toner cartridge business.

What is a Tickler File?

A tickler file is a reminder system that works in conjunction with your calendar and allows you to essentially “mail” physical items, such as bills, notes and paperwork, to yourself on specific future dates. It consists of a physical filing system of 43 folders - 12 folders for each month of the year and 31 folders for each day of the month. 

Let’s say that you get a bill in the mail that you want to handle three weeks from now. Most people would probably leave that bill in their inbox until the time came to handle it. With a tickler file at the ready, you simply drop that bill into the appropriate folder dated three weeks from now and presto!...That bill is now gone from your inbox and into a trusted system that won’t let you down.

And that’s the real beauty of a tickler file system. It’s a great solution for getting things out of your face that you don’t need to spend your precious attention on right now, yet it makes those items “magically” reappear when it’s time to deal with them.

Some Potential Uses of a Tickler File

What are some common applications of a tickler file? Here are a few common uses:

  1. Mailing yourself reports and support materials needed for a future meeting.
  2. Reminding yourself of bills that need to be paid before a certain date. This is great for avoiding late penalties and for maximizing your cash flow situation. 
  3. Revisiting purchases that you were considering on getting. You can either use your tickler file to give yourself a “cooling off” period before you make a large ticket purchase, or you can postpone a purchase and revisit it later when the budget is there to actually buy it.
  4. Keeping event tickets safe until the day you need them.
  5. Reminding yourself about upcoming events. Contemplating going to a conference, seminar or event, but haven’t made up your mind yet? Just throw the event brochure into your tickler file and revisit it later.
  6. Keeping travel information & documents safe. Put your passport, maps and other pertinent travel information in your tickler file for safe-keeping until the day you need it.
  7. Storing your hotel reservations and information.
  8. Mailing yourself coupons that should be used before the expiration date passes.
  9. Storing pre-written birthday cards to be sent on specific dates. This is great if you have a bunch of birthdays spread out across the month. You can batch them all together, get them all done and put each one in the appropriate folder to be mailed out on that particular day so they arrive just in time.
  10. Reminding yourself of items to be mailed off on a specific date. 
  11. Reminding yourself of subscription expirations & renewals.
  12. Reminding yourself about car and house maintenance jobs. 
  13. Giving yourself random moral-boosters. Everyone needs a little dose of positivity every now and then. Take something meaningful like an inspirational quote, a picture of a loved one(s) or even a letter addressed to your future self and “mail” it to yourself with your tickler file. It’ll bring a smile to your face when you receive it.

So Why Not Use a Calendar as a Reminder System?

If you’re a GTD purist, then you probably know that the space on your calendar is sacred and it should only be used for hard commitments and reminders, such as appointments, birthdays and deadlines. Your tasks and loose reminders should remain distinctly separate from your calendar items so that you can glance at your calendar during your daily review and immediately know what your time commitments are for that particular day. 

A tickler file compliments your calendar. It serves to house those items that you’d like to remind yourself of in the future as well as a container to house physical support documents that are necessary for that particular day, such as a spare key, a report or event tickets. Ultimately, your tickler file serves the purpose of de-cluttering your calendar so that it remains an effective time management tool for you.

Setting Up Your Tickler File

GTD tickler system using foldersSetting up your tickler file is both simple and inexpensive. You’ll need the following materials:

  • A narrow file box. Make sure it’s big enough to hold 43 manila folders and avoid getting a large file box because your folders won’t stay upright. You can find a narrow file box at any office supply store. Optionally, you can use the file drawer of your desk if you have one.
  • 12 colored manila folders. These will be used as your monthly folders. Colors are optional, but they do make identification a lot easier. If you’re going to be using your desk filing cabinet as your tickler file, then these should be hanging file folders instead of manila ones.
  • 31 plain manila folders. Make sure you get the manila folders with the tabs all in one spot for easier review. The manila folder packs with the assorted tab placements make a mess of your tickler file system.

Start by labeling each month of the year onto the 12 colored file folders. Then get the 31 day folders and label each one numerically from 1 to 31. Get your file box and place the monthly folders in the box with January facing you and December at the back of the box. Send those monthly folders that have already passed to the back of the file box. The current month should be the closest one to you. Insert the 31 day folders in the current month’s folder. Remove the days that have already passed and send them to the next month's folder. For example, if today is January 10th, then I'd remove day folders 1-9 from the January folder and send them to the February folder. Congratulations, your tickler system is now ready to use!

At the beginning of each day, take the current day's folder out of the tickler file and dump the contents into your inbox for processing. That empty folder then gets inserted at the back of the next month's folder. All the items in that folder then get processed according to standard GTD methodology. At the end of the month, the expired month’s folder gets put at the very back of the tickler file.

If you have an item that needs to be tickled beyond the 31 days, simply place it in the appropriate month’s folder and when you reach that month, empty out the contents for processing and re-assignment to one of the 31 day folders if necessary. The beauty of this system is that you’ve created a perpetual reminder system that never expires.

Analog Versus Digital Tickling

GTD tickler system in EvernoteOn one corner, there’s the GTD purists who stay true to the analog version of the tickler file system originally described by David Allen. On the other corner, are the techies who love to take the philosophy of the tickler system and hack it with the latest technology. Which one is better?

Well, who says that you can’t use both analog and digital tickling systems integrated together? Then you have the best of both worlds. Digital tickling makes it simple to send reminders, notes and emails to yourself. Analog tickling really helps for handling stuff that’s not digital, like files, reports, tickets and small items. I say use whatever you’re most comfortable with, but I’m a digital person that utilizes Evernote with GTD.

One idea for trying out digital tickling without downloading any new software is simply to use your existing email system. Most email systems nowadays allow you to send delayed emails. This is a wonderful feature because it allows you to write emails that can be sent later on to people and it allows you to send messages and forward emails to yourself on specific dates as well. Those emails that seem to linger in your inbox can now get forwarded to yourself on a specific date, allowing you to clear your inbox of those pesky lingering emails.

Getting Into the Habit

While the tickler file is a fantastic and versatile reminder system, it’s main crutch is that you actually have to develop the habit of using it every day otherwise it won’t work as a trusted reminder system. Most people who claim that tickler files don't work simply never got into the habit of regularly using them in the first place and without systematically checking your tickler file daily, the system breaks down. Experts generally agree that it takes about 21 days of unbroken practice to develop a habit, so start today and make tickling a regular productivity practice.

Sunshine and Smartphones Meet: Essential Warm Weather Apps

18. April 2013 07:38 by Calvin Yu in Technology News  //  Tags: , , , , , ,   //   Comments

Temperatures are finally rising, at least in most places across the United States, which means you're probably beginning to plan your favorite outdoor activities for the first time in months. Whether hiking, beach volleyball, summer concerts, or sunbathing are your preferred hobbies, there are specific apps you can use to help improve your outdoor experience. From video apps to GPS location devices to plant encyclopedias, there are limitless possibilities to stay connected, even when you're basking in the sunshine.

vine appShare life's precious moments with Vine.

Vine, created by social media website Twitter, allows you to take 6 second video clips with audio. Available only for iPhone or iPad, the app allows for video content to be shared more easily over the internet. How many times have you taken video only to realize it's too long to send through email or attach on a social media website? Vine takes the hassle out of this. Whether you're looking to capture a candid family moment or some incredible vista during a hike, there are limitless options available.

Landscaper's Companion for that green thumb.

If you've got a garden, plan on starting one, or love to identify plants on hikes, Landscaper's Companion is the perfect app for you. Rather than carrying that bulky encyclopedia with you, you can carry a fully searchable database of over 26,000 plants and 21,000 images. Not only can you access data online but you can also make notes on specific plants. Have you noticed they only like a certain amount of sunshine or water? It takes the hassle out of trying to remember little details that are generally easy to forget or confuse. Better yet: it's available on both iOS and Android devices.

zLocation appNever get meeting points confused again with zLocation.

Have you ever gone on a hike with multiple people or tried to find your friends at a specific point on a beach that goes on for miles without avail? zLocation takes the hassle out of planning meeting points. You can create a meeting location point using GPS, provide a name and add specific location details if you're doing something like planning a beach volleyball excursion. Even if your friends don't have the app or an iOS, they'll be able to access the specific event through a mobile optimized browser.

These are just 3 suggestions to help make those outdoor plans easier. When it comes to enjoying the great outdoors, you don't want to be too connected to your phone, but you also want to be able to plan the activities you love wihout having to worry about all of the small details. Feel free to share some other outdoor or spring/summer related app below. Otherwise enjoy the sunshine!

Guide to Wireless Printing from Your Computer and Mobile Phone

While printing dates back to the mid-15th century, wireless printing has only become commonly used in the last two decades. Wireless printing is, as the name clearly states, the ability to use a printer without a wire or a cord connecting the printer and computer. This will allow you to print from any computer within appropriate range of the printer, which will most likely be anywhere within your home. The average distance for wireless printing is approximately 100 feet, but this can vary based on the manufacturer. This wireless technology allows multiple family members to print from their personal computers to the same household printer.

3 Ways to Set Up Wireless Printing

  1. USB Cable: Many wireless printers will come with installation software and a USB cable. If you connect the printer and computer using the USB, you will be prompted to follow the installation guide setup steps. Once completed, you will be able to remove the USB and print wirelessly.

    Printer connected by a USB cable

  2. Wireless Setup Wizard: Using this method, you can setup wireless printing directly from the printer itself using either its control panel or touchscreen. You’ll need to follow a few quick steps and enter answers for questions such as the name of your wireless network and password.
  3. Wi-Fi Protected Setup: Similarly to the wireless setup wizard, you can also use this method using the printers control panel or touchscreen. If your home already has a WPS router with a push-button, after following a few printer setup steps, you will be able to push the button to activate the printer wirelessly with your computer.

Printing from personal computers is the most common form of printing and has been around almost as long as the computer itself. This form is used in offices and homes worldwide and while the printing technology has remained mostly the same, printers themselves have gotten more advanced.

The printer supply industry generates over $100 billion dollars a year. This includes not just printers, but also the ink cartridges or toner cartridges supplies. However, since smartphones and tablets hit the marketplace, the need to print from all technological forms grew as well. Since this need was growing, different mobile applications created by each leading manufacturer such as HP and Epson began emerging for both tablet and smart phone use.

What are my Options for Wireless Mobile Printing?

Regardless of the tablet or smartphone you have, there is a surplus of mobile printing apps to choose from. A few of the options you may use include Bluetooth printing, Apple AirPrint, or manufacturer applications. Allow us to highlight a few of the options:

    Apple iPhone AirPrint settings
  1. Bluetooth printing: Perhaps a more outdated technology, Bluetooth printing is primarily used with mobile phones, yet unlike Wi-Fi, your phone must be used within a few meters of the printer. This is best for phones without a Wi-Fi connection that are enabled for Bluetooth printing.
  2. Apple AirPrint: This is a great option for anyone who uses an Apple device whether an iPad or an iPhone. However AirPrint only applies to software versions 4.2 or later. There are several printers that are compatible with AirPrint including many Epson and HP models. Just locate what you would like to print on your phone, locate the print button (no application download needed), and your phones software will find all AirPrint printers in range you can print from.
  3. HP ePrint settings
  4. HP ePrint: This application can be downloaded directly from your mobile phone. The app is not only compatible with most HP printers, but is also compatible with Word, Excel, PowerPoint, photos, web pages, and more. The easy to use interface makes it simple to print documents, images, or web pages. If you have the appropriate printer and the application downloaded, make sure your printer is stocked with HP ink cartridges.
    Brother iPrint&Scan settings
  5. Brother iPrint&Scan: This app can also be downloaded directly from your mobile phone and is compatible with most Brother printers. In addition to an easy-to-use interface, the Brother app also allows you to set up scans from your smartphone and send results wirelessly to your printer. Don’t forget to fill your office or home printer with Epson ink cartridges before sending documents to print.

Printer applications have now become mainstream for most large manufacturers and have become expected by consumers. In the future, we can expect that most new smartphones will come with already enabled printing features, making the setup and installation process easier and easier. 

 

Getting Things Done (GTD) With Context-Based Task Lists

11. April 2013 10:22 by Calvin Yu in Productivity  //  Tags: , ,   //   Comments

There was a time not so long ago when I would write down all my tasks on a single master list in my day planner and as I completed my tasks, I would cross them off that list. That worked fine in my earlier days, but when I started my printer supply business, that master list went from being a single page to an entire pad of paper! I quickly realized that I needed a new system for managing my tasks.

That’s when I came across David Allen’s book Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity, which offered a new way of managing tasks that made a lot of sense to me. Allen said that trying to manage tasks via a master list was mentally-draining and it didn’t adequately address the fact that tasks have inherent dependencies assigned to them that need to be met before they can actually be completed. Allen suggested that it’s better to have your tasks grouped by common dependencies and assigned to one of multiple task lists, which he refers to as contexts. There’s less mental stress involved when you’re dealing with a task list that you can actual get done versus one where you must pick and choose which tasks you can actually get done right now. I quickly adopted this system of context-based task lists and my productivity sky-rocketed.

What is a Context?

You can think of a context as a group of tasks that all share a common constraint. Usually that constraint is either a physical location or it's a required resource. It might also be a specific individual or group of individuals. A typical list of contexts might include:

@Office - for all your business or professional tasks that must be done at the office
@Home - for all the personal tasks that can be done at home
@Town - for the tasks that are done around town
@Computer - for all the tasks that can be done on your computer

GTD'ers usually designate a context by placing an "@" symbol in front of it. The beauty of organizing your tasks by context is the fact that they’re already pre-sorted for you - so all you need to do is to go through each task within your context and get them done without having to worry about priority or having the necessary resources available.

How to Set Up Your Context Lists

In order to build a set of contexts that work well for your situation, it's important that you focus on the core dependency that each task relies on. Buying milk, eggs, salad and juice are dependent on me being at the supermarket in order to get them done, so it would be logical for me to have an @Supermarket context for these. Paying cable and utilities bills for some people might be an @Home context. Since I pay my bills online, this is actually an @Computer context for me. There’s plenty of flexibility built into this system to customize it to your heart’s content, so long as you stick to the criteria for building your context lists.

Creating contexts based on physical location is probably the easiest constraint to define because it’s generally the easiest to identify. The action of buying milk has to be done at the supermarket. The action of submitting a report to your boss has to be done at work. Location-based contexts work well for people who have definite edges around their various roles and responsibilities. Employees working for a company fit well into this profile because they typically have the most separation between their personal space and their professional space. Location-based contexts might be less effective for someone who operates a home-based business or is a freelancer because technically there’s no separation between work and personal environments in so far as physical location is concerned.

In addition to location, you can also set up your contexts based on resources. Having the necessary tools available that will allow you to complete your task is every bit as important as being in the right location to get it done. A common example of this is the @Computer context. If you only own a desktop, then I guess this might be a location-based context for you, but if you’re like me and go everywhere with a laptop in hand, then location is no longer a factor - the dependency lies with having the computer with you. Resource-based contexts are used more frequently by people who travel a lot or who are always on the move, like consultants, attorneys, professional speakers and sales professionals.

I personally would not create contexts based on subjective factors such as priority level or energy level. The problem with this is that 1) they’re not true constraint-based contexts, and 2) they’re prone to avoidance at the sub-conscious level for some people. Let’s face it, we know that high-priority and high-energy level tasks are difficult, so it’s easier to avoid those and pick away at the lesser tasks first and that defeats the whole purpose of GTD.

Beware of Too Many or Too Few Contexts

One of the things that you'll have to be careful of when you're customizing your context lists is not going overboard with building too many of them. It's a common problem amongst GTD'ers and it's something that David Allen warns against. He recommends creating the least amount of contexts necessary to fit your purpose. The problem that arises when you create too many specialized contexts is that now you have too many areas to check for tasks and that defeats the whole workflow model of GTD. An example of this is someone who sub-divides their @Computer context into @Amazon, @Facebook, @Twitter, @Email, etc. While none of these contexts are bad in and of themselves, if you only have one or two tasks per context, or if you fail to regularly check these contexts daily, then it defeats the whole purpose of GTD. It would probably serve you better to combine your specialized lists together into one broad context in order to keep your GTD system clean and efficient.

On the flip side, there might be times when you need to divide your context in order to make it more manageable. Perhaps you have a growing list of 30+ next actions under your @Computer context. Large lists can be difficult to manage and review, so you might want to break it down into a separate context such as @Email to make your review and execution more effective.

When to Place Your Tasks Into Your Context Lists

You should assign your tasks to a specific context when you’re processing your inbox. Remember that in the collection stage of GTD, you’re primary goal is non-evaluative collection of all your “stuff.” Once all your stuff is collected, then you can evaluate what each piece is and assign it to its particular place. When you come across a task during your processing stage, then that’s the point where you can place it onto one of the context lists that you’ve created.

Contexts and Evernote

I mentioned in a prior post that I use Evernote as my GTD software of choice. Contexts are tailor-made for Evernote. I simply set up a group of tags in Evernote with the “@” symbol in front of it and Evernote automatically bumps those tags to the top of my list for easy sorting. I use both the desktop version and the mobile version of Evernote as my universal collection tool and when I process all my tasks in my Evernote Inbox, I simply assign it a context tag. When I’m ready to get work done, I just click on the appropriate context tag and it pulls up all the tasks that are pending within that context. It’s a wonderful system that’s allowed me to be highly productive.

SurePayroll Features 247inktoner

surepayrollSurePayroll is one of the leading online providers of payroll services to small businesses and is our preferred provider at 247inktoner. Their interface, including the ability to access services on mobile devices, allows us to take the hassle out of payroll services. Every month SurePayroll features one of their customers to highlight "secrets of their success." For April 2013, we are their featured client.

The short article highlights our commitment to providing low-cost ink and toner catridges while creating a headache-free customer service experience from buying the cartridges to having them shipped. Some of our secrets include: free shipping for all orders $50 or more, the ability to mix and match different ink and toner cartridges to provide discounts, and our 100% satisfaction guarantee.

However, our success also hinges on our commitment to use technology to stay organized. As the article quotes me saying, "I quickly realized that I needed a process and set of tools to help me stay organized; otherwise, I would have run the risk of becoming completely overwhelmed." These tools include the Getting Things Done methodology and cloud services provided by Evernote, which we describe in more detail in a recent blog post. Using these systems have allowed me to reach inbox zero, file away important documents including receipts, and help organize daily tasks in a more systematic way.

As always, we're grateful for the support our customers provide everyday. Your enthusiasm about our products and your suggestions on how to help improve your experience with 247inktoner allow us to implement changes on a daily basis. Feel free to share your favorite thing about using 247inktoner or offer any additional suggestions below. We want to hear from you!

Is Inbox Zero Really that Elusive?

4. April 2013 11:47 by Calvin Yu in Productivity, Technology News  //  Tags: , , , , , , ,   //   Comments

inbox zero

If you've just looked at your email inbox, it's likely that you have dozens, hundreds, or, in the worst case scenario, thousands of emails to contend with. Maybe some of them are unread, maybe others are read. No matter where your inbox stands, there's a way to unclutter all of that information. Though it doesn't happen overnight, incremental steps can help you figure out the mess your inbox might be. The following tips are mostly applicable to all email clients, though some are Gmail specific.

Start by removing the unnecessary messages from your inbox.

If you're anything like us, it's likely that you use email to receive promotional emails from businesses, whether it's for discounts and deals or product updates. However, how many of you also forget to delete these emails in your inbox? It's likely that over the years you've accumulated hundreds or thousands of emails. Try searching by specific terms (as an example, "LivingSocial") and see how many emails pop up. By searching by specific terms, you're able to delete emails in bulk, saving you valuable time.

Consider email labels and special folders to archive existing messages.

Often times individuals get multiple email accounts forwarded to a primary email account. However, many forget to label incoming messages and archive emails to the correct folders. Without search terms, you have to plug keywords into the search bar, hoping you don't have to sift through hundreds of messages. By using labels and folders you'll able to find specific information much more efficiently. With particularly valuable emails, this makes more sense, not only saving you time but helping ensure the messages might not get lost among less important ones.

Give yourself an hour every week to assess the state of your inbox.

Be proactive with your inbox. Rather than waiting until spring to clean out your inbox, give yourself 30 minutes or an hour every week to assess the state of your inbox. Do you notice important unread messages? Are there emails that can be deleted? Have you not heard from someone you had expected to? By taking time to look at your inbox, you keep it both more organized and ensure you're not missing out on any important conversation.

Consider investing in mobile apps can let you focus your attention elsewhere.

mailbox app featuresWhile it's great to have an organized inbox on your desktop, don't forget the potential of mobile apps to help you organize your inbox. One of our current favorites is Mailbox. Though it is available only for those with iPhones, you're able to use any Gmail account, including Google business accounts. What is particularly useful about this is the ability to archive messages and receive notifications for them at a later date. For instance, say you just bought tickets for a concert in three months but don't want to print them out now. You're able to select any date and time in the future to have that message return to your inbox.

By not having those emails in your inbox or having to worry about plugging in a unique calendar notification, you reduce clutter and let yourself focus on those more pressing messages in your inbox.

Finally, give yourself a break from your inbox, at least for a part of every day.

Do you ever find yourself checking your inbox right when you wake up or right before bed? We'd recommend against it. By feeling like you're constantly "on the clock" to answer emails, you never get distance between your personal life and your technology. It always feels like some communication is lingering over you, part of a constant to-do list. Not only can you get burnt out from email communication, but you're also likely not to feel like you want to keep up on your inbox organization.

Though these are just some possible tips, we're confident they can help get you one step closer to inbox zero. Though it might seem daunting at first, by taking incremental steps anyone can reach a state of email zen. My personal method is to couple David Allen's Getting Things Done (GTD) methodology with Evernote, learn more about how I maximize my productivity at 247inktoner.com.  Feel free to share your favorite tips for keeping your inbox organized below!

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